Davidson-Arabia Mountain

I love Arabia Mountain in Conyers, GA and I think its a super underrated spot in Georgia. It's a 20m drive from where I live, so Cleo and I visit often. Last week we packed up our bikes, because there are some great trails, and our cameras and headed out. After a quick ride, we went and scouted our spot to watch and capture the sunset. Here are a few of my favorite images. 

A Moon to Remember

I'll forever be in awe of the moon and it's textures. This shot was from a spot off of Chapman's Peak Road in Cape Town, SA. After we'd finished watching the sunset, we looked behind us and caught this beautiful moon rising behind one of the mountains.

Fujifilm XT1  //  ISO 200  //  140mm @ f4.0  //  1/250sec

Catching the Full Moon Rise

Earlier this week, Cleo and I went out to watch the sunset at one of my favorite spots in the city and I hoped to catch the full moonrise in a sequence. I'd seen it done so many times and had always been fascinated, so I wanted to give it a shot. Thankfully we had a super clear night and it was a great temperature, all that was left was to capture the moments. 

I'd done some research earlier in the day (though I should have scouted a couple days before) as to where I wanted to set up based on where the moon would be rising using the super helpful app The Photographer's Ephemeris

Fujifilm XT1  //  ISO 200  //  140mm @ f7.1  //  1/160sec handheld

I set up my Fujifilm XT1 and decided to use the incredibly sharp 50-140mm f2.8 for the sequence. My view was blocked a bit by some of the buildings, so I ran down the street to see if I could see the moon, and sure enough despite my research, it had already started rising 20min earlier than expected. I snapped the shot above then headed back to my location frame up my shot. When framing your shot, you need to think about where the moon will end up in the sky and frame accordingly. The moon rises in the East and sets West.

Fujifilm XT1  //  ISO 200  // 50mm @ f10  //  1/40sec on MeFoto tripod

The first image I took would serve as my foreground for the composite. It's super important to make sure you get your exposure for the moon right, but it's easy to overexpose. Make sure you zoom in (if your camera is capable) and look for the details in the moon. As a rule of thumb, it's always better to underexpose than to overexpose. 

Once I got the first shot, I kept my exposure the same for the next hour and a half. As ambient light from the sunset disappears, my scene get dramatically darker. But what's most important is that the moon is exposed correctly. 

Fujifilm XT1  //  ISO 200  // 50mm @ f10  //  1/40sec on MeFoto tripod

As you see above, all of the detail is lost in the photo, but the moon detail is perfect. Again, my exposure was the same for all of the 22 shots I took in this sequence. Here is the final composite image.

Final Image. Composed of 22 individual photos.

For the editing process, I imported all of the photos into Lightroom and labeled them with a blue flag so I could separate them from the rest of the images taken that night. I used my first images for the foreground and performed my normal edits by straightening and cropping, then tweaking the highlights, shadows, whites and blacks. I bumped the clarity and vibrance up a bit, then sharpened and added just a bit of luminance for a little noise reduction in the sky. Once I was happy with that image, I copied all of the settings from my foreground photo and applied those settings to the rest of the photos in the sequence. 

Now that all the photos were in sync, all that was left was to make the composite....and it's MUCH easier than you think thanks to the free program StarStax! I followed this easy tutorial and the composite was done in less than 5 minutes.

I hope you enjoy the final image and the walkthrough, please let me know if you'd like to see more of these and I will start posting more. Have a great day and go capture something beautiful!  

Fujifilm XT1  //  ISO 200  //  16mm @ f14  //  30 seconds on MeFoto tripod

On a Whim

We had a pretty thick fog come through Atlanta this morning and it stuck around for quite a while. After sitting at the computer for a little bit trying to do some work, I just felt like I needed to go shoot for a little bit. So my wife and I got ready in about 10m and hopped in the car to an unknown destination.

Lesson #1: Always have your cameras ready, your batteries charged, and your memory cards formatted and clean. 

We made it about 50 yards and pulled into a park across the street from where we live that we haven't spent much time at. I knew there was a lake though and thought the fog might make for some prettiness. Here's a couple shots that are the result of going with my gut on a whim.  

Lesson #2: Listen to your gut sometimes. 

The New River Gorge, West Virginia

My wife and I decided to make a little pit stop last weekend in West Virginia on our way home from visiting our relatives in Ohio for the holidays. We didn't really need to be back in Atlanta the next day, so we decided to stay the night at a cheap hotel and go check out the amazing New River Gorge Bridge. I'd been there once before about 10 years ago and remembered it being one of my favorite places I'd visited. 

Once we saw the bridge and started crossing it, all the memories flooded back. I knew we'd made the right decision. 

This was the first view we got of bridge after we parked. It seemed to go on and on and the rolling fog at times made it just disappear. It was so beautiful I decided to shoot a little time lapse (which I have yet to have time to put together. no worries, it's on the agenda for next week.) I took this shot with the fujifilm xt1 and the 10-24mm. 

This was the first view we got of bridge after we parked. It seemed to go on and on and the rolling fog at times made it just disappear. It was so beautiful I decided to shoot a little time lapse (which I have yet to have time to put together. no worries, it's on the agenda for next week.) I took this shot with the fujifilm xt1 and the 10-24mm. 

Once I shot about 10 seconds worth of time lapse material (250 shots) we made our way down to another path that opened up to this beautiful view. As you can see, the fog was coming in pretty thick about this time. So we set up shop for a while and soaked in this moment (literally, because it started raining). After the blanket of fog had come and gone, we got in our car to head down to the bottom of the gorge. There are lots of places to stop along the way with different angles/views of the bridge, but most of them were covered by trees. Below are a few shots we took on the way down. 

There is nothing like a thick layer of fog to add a nice mood to photos. 

We could have stayed at the bottom of the gorge for hours. The rolling fog created new scenes every minute. I set up on the smaller bridge and shot another time lapse of the larger bridge. Then we walked around for a while shooting all angles. Our last stop before we left was a little pull-off with a few beautiful waterfalls. Overall, this "pit-stop" has now become a favorite spot. We'll be returning for a weekend once we get some color again. Hope you enjoyed following our little adventure! 

*All photos available for prints. Please use the contact form for inquire about pricing.